HOW TO SELL TO CHINESE CONSUMERS: THREE TIPS

By Barry Li


Last year, one of my colleagues built two semi-detached houses, wanting to sell one. His question to me was: How do I sell it to a Chinese buyer? There’s an implied understanding in that question that Chinese buyers will pay a premium to acquire a property.

Besides possible higher premiums, the other reason to target Chinese consumers is that it can help your business expand to a larger market .

View full post at dynamicbusiness.com.au

How did China become so ‘hot’?

By Barry Li

Anyone who has visited the country recently knows the growth in China is real, and very visible. In 1950 some 544 million people lived mostly in villages; by 2015, the population had ballooned to 1.38 billion people, with 56 per cent living in cities. The scale of construction being carried out to accommodate this population growth is stunning. Besides housing, the new population needs food, clothing, transport, services and entertainment. The supply of every household product to its own population alone would make China the largest market by volume in the world.

View full post at kochiesbusinessbuilders.com.au

Selling to the Chinese: leveraging the “One Child Policy” effect

By Barry Li

Most Australians are familiar with China’s “one child policy”. Enforced around the time of my birth in China three and a half decades ago, this policy evolved into a “two child policy” just a couple of years ago in response to China’s aging population. The policy has been criticised by the Western world since the day it started and likely hated by many Chinese families who’d prefer to have multiple kids. What Australians may not be aware of is that the consequences occurring because of this policy has resulted in the boom of many Australian industries.

View full post at openforum.com.au

The political sensitivities that should be observed when doing business with China

By Barry Li

There was news recently that a lecturer from Monash University had unintentionally offended Chinese students with a question regarding Chinese stereotypes in a course quiz. Following university inquiries, the lecturer was suspended and Monash has since removed the popular textbook (Human Resources Management by Raymond J. Stone) while apologising to the incensed Chinese community. The business school textbook quoted outdated information about Chinese government officials and skilled labours, resulting in Chinese international students feeling humiliated.  While I personally believe that some may have overacted to the inappropriate question, the textbook – despite being republished in its 9th edition this year – clearly needs its contents revised and updated; universities and lecturers from this experience should enhance their awareness of political sensitivities while doing business with China, and this very much includes when teaching Chinese international students.

View full post at onlineopinion.com.au

How to Sell to the Chinese Market

By Barry Li

In the big, fast-moving consumer goods company my wife works for, management devotes a lot of energy to their China strategy. Last year one of their products, a mosquito repellent for children, sold really well in China through Diagous (Chinese shopping agents). This year they produced more of the same product specifically for the Chinese market, and thoughtfully added labels with Chinese information. To their great surprise, the product did not sell as well.

View full post at kochiesbusinessbuilders.com.au 

An insider’s view on Chinese buyers

In 2013 my wife and I were looking to buy our first home – something bigger in a nice suburb with a good school nearby. During the inspection for a three-bedroom unit in Killara I said to my wife “Wow, look at this, there’s no other Chinese buyers here. I think we can get this one!” And indeed, we did.

Unlike those cash-loaded, overseas Chinese buyers you see at property auctions, my wife and I are new migrants living on monthly Australian salaries. In addition to the normal frustration of being defeated at auctions by the super-rich Chinese, we also suffer from the common criticism today that “the Chinese” have and are pushing up property prices in Australia. I can’t blame people who put it that way because, the truth is, Chinese home buyers have lots to do with the property market in Australia…

View full post at onlineopinion.com.au

 

Brave young Chinese ‘briber’ should be commended

By Barry Li

Two weeks ago, a Chinese international student running for election on the University of Sydney Union board was disqualified for bribery and graffiti painting on campus walls. My initial reaction was of pity. No one taught this poor girl how to run a proper election campaign. How could she know any better? Chinese politics are not based on elections. It was great she tried; it was not a surprise she failed. I thought that was the end of the story.. [Read more]